human choroinic gonadotropin

Critical Thinking in Nursing

Written by kimmel52 on January 8, 2012 – 9:57 pm

nurse pic

critical thinking in nursing
nancy kimmel
September 30, 2014

Critical Thinking in Nursing

As a new nurse, I remember how frightened I was that someone would die do my lack of experience or a poor judgment call. I will never forget my one instructor who said, “You will make a medication error at some point in your nursing career.” That statement shook me to the core. How could that happen? During my orientation on the medical/surgical step down unit, I witnessed nurses nonchalantly switching out I.V. bags of different solutions without first checking the drugs compatibility. What if one of those medications causes a precipitate to form in the line? Then what? Someone could die of an embolism!
Soon I was on my own shift with my own patient load. The fears that plagued me during nursing school did not magically disappear, but instead became magnified. I was a nervous wreck. How did these other nurses manage their patient load with such grace under pressure? When would this ominous fear of doing something wrong let up? For me, it never did. The delicate balance between life and death based on a decision or action is what kept me sharp. Eventually I was able to display a calm exterior while internally; I was ready to react at the slightest change in my patient’s condition. There were no cutting corners. I know that sounds crazy. Obviously, when there were no washcloths we had to use towels, or sometimes we had to make do with what supplies were on the floor. Did I ever deliberately cut a corner just to save time? The answer is no. Everything that I do is for my patient. Even the smallest action of making a toe pleat in the bed or mitering a corner was a action of respect for the patient in that bed.
Nursing school prepared me with critical thinking skills. As my experience as nurse progressed, I became better at assessing a patient’s condition. I would not say that I became an expert according to Benner’s Stages of Critical Competence.(Benner, 2011, para. 5)
Making a competent clinical decision is not based on just one lab result or a patient’s symptoms. The personality traits of going above and beyond, taking risks and deliberate practice seem to be the traits that make an expert nurse.(Kaminski, 2010, p. 967)
Benner’s Stages(Benner, 2011, table 1) verified that I have much to learn. I am looking forward to learning more about evidenced based practice and the critical thinking skills necessary in advanced practice nursing.
Advanced Practice Nurses have the responsibility of providing and documenting research on evidenced based practice for the nursing profession as a whole. Nursing continues to develop and progress into a clinical science. This development is due to the efforts of those nurses who understand the dynamics of change in the role of the nurse in today’s society.

References
Benner, P. (2011, December 20). “Staged” Models of Skills Acquisition. Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates. Retrieved from http://www.umdnj.edu/idsweb/idst5340/models_skills_acquisition.htm
Kaminski, J. (2010). Theory applied to Informatics- Novice to Expert. Retrieved from http://cjni.net/journal/?p=967


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Pass The Nursing Entrance Test | No Comments »

THE HESI A&P KNOWLEDGE

Written by kimmel52 on June 7, 2009 – 5:31 pm

Those who are planning to sit for the HESI EXAM, the TEAS-ATT, or the NURSING ENTRANCE TESTwill probably have to apply their knowledge of anatomy and physiology. At the nurses learning centerthe student will find thousands of questions and tests with online access to practice their anatomy and physiology anytime throughout the day or night. Preparing for the anatomy and physiology section of the HESI, THE NURSING ENTRANCE TEST OR THE TEAS, can be a daunting task without proper preparation. The student of A&P is required to study vast amounts of knowledge. This knowledge over two semesters is very difficult to retain, especially with other classes that the student is taking. Therefore it helps to have the right test knowledge streamlined at the student’s fingertips. The articles contained in this site will assist the student preparing for the NURSING ENTRANCE TEST, THE HESI, and the TEAS-ATT anatomy and physiology section to help bring that knowledge to a level that is actually applicable. Similar to nursing school. As a matter of fact, the topics that are covered in the A&P section on the NURSING ENTRANCE TEST, is covered in the first semester of nursing school. For instance, in the paragraphs that follow the subject is how people get allergies. This is directly related to the immune system and the immunoglobin E, which controls the severity of the reaction.

HESI A&P Topics

HESI A&P Topics


Why do we get allergies? Perhaps your mother, grandmother or someone in your family suffers from allergies. Does this mean that you will inherit the same allergies? Well, actually, it is very possible. Allergies are caused from an immune response that the body mounts against the allergen. This can happen at any time during a persons life. For example, strawberries may not have ever bothered you, but one day you eat a strawberry and then you begin to break out in hives, a runny nose, congestion and difficulty breathing. More than likely at this point, your body mounted an allergic response to strawberries. Therefore the next time and each consecutive time after, that you eat a strawberry, the allergic response of your body will become more and more pronounced. Immunoglobuin E or IgE is the protagonist that ultimately begins the cascade of a series of physiological reactions that ultimately result in allergy symptoms. Histamines are then released to the areas that are most sensitive, such as nose, throat and eyes. The nervous system is comprised of a division called the autonominc nervous system which branches into the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Sympathetic nervous system: A part of the nervous system that serves to accelerate the heart rate, constrict blood vessels, and raise blood pressure. The sympathetic nervous system and the parasympathetic nervous system constitute the autonomic nervous system, the branch of the nervous system that performs involuntary functions. The parasympathetic nervous system is activated during an allergic response, which is why we feel like we are filling up with fluid. Physicians usually prescribe antihistamines such as the brand Benadryl or Epi-pens to alleviate severe allergy symptoms by stimulating the sympathetic nervous system. People with allergies are told to avoid those foods or items which cause an allergic response. With people who have multiple allergies, it is not always possible to refrain or avoid all of the allergens that cause them reactions. Therefore, such over the counter remedies fall short of helping the person live a allergy symptom life. Sometimes it becomes necessary for physicians to prescribe autoimmune drugs in order to surppress the patient’s immune system to prevent a severe allergic response.  This type of treatment has its drawbacks since it renders the patient helpless against attack from viruses and disease.  Many common ailments that plague people stem from some type of allergic response, such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, and HIV.


Tags: , , ,
Posted in HESI TEAS The NET ATT, How to Pass the HESI | No Comments »