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The NET Reading Comprehension, Learn How to Pass

Written by kimmel52 on December 23, 2009 – 7:44 pm

Reading is the key to passing the NET reading comprehension tests

The Nursing Entrance Test Reading Comprehension

How does one approach the reading comprehension section on the Nursing Entrance Test?  No matter which of the nursing entrance tests you may be preparing for, whether it be the HESI, the T.E.A.S. or the N.E.T., each will have its own very challenging reading comprehension section.   Many for one are unprepared for the wealth of reading that is required and the computerized method of testing. It can be difficult for those who are not computer savvy to comfortably navigate from page to another and go back to re-read. Time is of course of the essence in taking any test. Why is it that so many people have trouble passing the reading comprehension portion? There are several answers to this question. The first answer is that the majority of the population have not received enough training in how to critically think. In high schools and community colleges the need to push student’s to critically analyze what they read is lacking. This translates to poor scores on reading comprehension and hence the many pre-English classes that are offered. Unfortunately these courses are not always sufficient to prepare the student for the level of difficulty associated with the reading comprehension on the Nursing Entrance Test. The other answer is that sufficient preparatory material is lacking in the educational market. While there are various books touted as the official NET Study Guide, the core content need for passing is lacking. The best preparation just like any standardized test is to find similar questions and consequently detailed explanations. Once a student is able to understand exactly what is being asked of them the answers seen not as difficult. However, those students who do well with out any preparation are those that are avid readers and have been avid readers since they could pick up a book. The questions are at best hard to assimilate due to the ambiguous nature of the way that they are asked. This can be a stumbling block for those who are not prepared afore hand for the reading comprehension section of the Nursing Entrance Test.

To sufficiently prepare for the type of questions that are asked one must practice reading passages and answering questions in a similar format. The software, The Nursing Entrance Test Study Guide, has successfully prepared many nursing school students to pass the Nursing Entrance Test with higher than the national average score. This is due to the fact that the author, Dr. Nancy Lydia Kimmel, a professor of Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Chemistry and Math, author of several books on education took the Nursing Entrance Test, has tutored many students on and scored in the top five percent in the nation herself.

Upon taking the test, Dr. Kimmel conceived and wrote the software entitled, The Nursing Entrance Test Study Guide. Dr. Kimmel, designed the reading comprehension section in the same format as the Nursing Entrance Test and provided the student with complete explanations and methods for answering the questions. The essays included in The Nursing Entrance Test Study Guide are of equal if not longer in length from those on the Nursing Entrance Test and the computerized format is the same. This gives the student the advantage of practicing in a similar situation, thereby eliminating the initial shock and adjustment time needed when actually taking the exam.

The student can scroll back and forth at their leisure or use the timed method. Each of the essays deal with the subject matter that requires the student to carefully read and comprehend. Similar in format to the actual test, The Nursing Entrance Test Study Guide is an asset to anyone that is preparing to take the Nursing Entrance Test. All of the students who have used Dr. Kimmel’s software have passed the reading comprehension section on the Nursing Entrance Test.

One of the pitfalls that students find when taking the reading comprehension, is that they have a hard time assimilating new knowledge and answering questions that have a high level of difficulty associated with them. Dr. Kimmel’s software that also includes math preparation covers the important principals and assists the student in mastering key words when reading.

Certain key words are typically used over and over again in reading comprehension questions. Words, and statements such as, the author assumed, inferred or the paragraph stated are key to understanding and grasping the questioning methodology.

When answering questions, it is sometimes hard to relate concepts that seem totally unrelated. This type of questioning requires abstract thinking. The questions are designed to test the reader’s analytical reasoning while at the same time test their vocabulary. It is always advisable when reading to have a dictionary at hand. Other examples of similar reading comprehension tests can be found in graduate entrance exam practice books. Entering into the nursing field will indeed require unique analysis skills in many different forms.

If you have the desire to go into nursing, then you must first get ready to take the N.E.T., the HESI or the TEAS entrance test. You can begin preparing for your career by practicing your skills using the online tutorials and tests at The Nurses Learning Center. There are over 1000 questions and answers. You will get unlimited internet access, 24/7. It is yours to keep. New questions are added daily. It’s like sitting for the N.E.T., The HESI or the TEAS in your home.


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Posted in Reading Comprehension, Reading Comprehension Exerpt NET Practice Test, The NET Reading Comprehension Section | 1 Comment »

How We Learn,The Nursing Entrance Test – Psychological Profile Test

Written by kimmel52 on October 29, 2009 – 6:04 am

How Do We Learn Powerpoint

The Nursing Entrance Test – Psychological Profile Test

Anyone who takes the Nursing Entrance Test must take the psychological profile assessment upon completion of the math and reading comprehension sections. This assessment includes questions that may seem too personal for some people to comfortably divulge on topics that ask about details of their personalities, finances and emotions. Many of us are not predisposed to giving out details of our lives and about who we really are.

The first thing that the student is told when taking this assessment is that there are no points added or deducted for answers. Basically, the assessment section, as personal as it may seem, is actually used for statistical analysis. In other words, a study is done by compiling all of the information from everyone who has taken the Nursing Entrance Test and a profile of the typical nursing student emerges. This data is also stored for a period of time to be able to track those behaviors and personalities that are the most successful in the nursing program.

You and I may never be privy to this information or know what characteristics a typical nursing student embodies, except the company that is hired to do the analysis and the nursing schools. Therefore the best advice that can be given to someone who is about to take the Nursing Entrance Test is to Read more »


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Pass The Nursing Entrance Test Reading Comprehension

Written by kimmel52 on October 23, 2009 – 7:29 pm

By Nancy l Kimmel RN Phd CHMM

How does one approach the reading comprehension section on the Nursing Entrance Test? Many for one are unprepared for the wealth of reading that is required and the computerized method of testing. It can be difficult for those who are not computer savvy to comfortably navigate from page to another and go back to re-read. Time is of course of the essence in taking any test. The questions are at best hard to assimilate due to the ambiguous nature of the way that they are asked. This can be a stumbling block for those who are not prepared before hand for the reading comprehension section of the Nursing Entrance Test. Read more »


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“PASS THE N.E.T. SEMINAR”

Written by kimmel52 on October 23, 2009 – 7:12 pm

How Did Our Seminar Go?
10/23/09
Well folks we had a great time at the “Pass the N.E.T.” seminar last night. There were students all over the greater metro Detroit area present. A lot of learning took place. We had reading comprehension and math handouts, the Nursing Entrance CD, and a free subscription to the Nurses Learning Center online tutorial with practice tests, not to mention the four hours of one on one instruction and tutoring. It went great. We covered much of the pertinent topics, such as how to test smarter, not harder, tips on how to increase scores in the reading comprehension section and how to handle those difficult fractions in the math section. There was another seminar going on a few doors down dealing with improving reading comprehension abilities in high school students. They liked our handouts so much that they asked for some so they could incorporate it into their new curriculum design. What a wonderful night of learning.
There were many students that wanted to attend but couldn’t. They called asking if we were going to have another seminar. Indeed we are. Tentatively our next seminar date will be toward the middle of February. Look for flyers at your local college book stores. By the way, we would like to extend our many thanks to Pat, manager of all five of the Wayne County Community College Book stores who allowed us to put up our flyers, and a big thank you to our local Henry Ford Community College Book Store. We apologize to all of the students for giving such late notice regarding the seminar. So absolutely, we are going to do this again.
The staff at the Double Tree Hotel in Detroit, were courteous and professional in handling all of our needs. The tables had white table cloths with pitchers of fresh ice water and crystal glasses at each table. The participants had their own pen and pad of paper, and what beautiful room décor. We will certainly choose the Double Tree Experience again at our next seminar. Thanks again Double Tree.
In the seminar we covered test anxiety. This was a big topic. Students loose points due to test anxiety, even though they know the material. By tackling test anxiety and learning how to use visual guided imagery the student can increase their test score by ten points at the least. Many of the students had questions regarding how many times they could take the Nursing Entrance Test. Some schools will only allow three attempts, while other schools will allow unlimited attempts. Questions arose regarding whether or not the Nursing Entrance Test could be taken at one school and transferred to another. While some schools do accept the scores from other schools, it is not the norm. Most schools will only accept student’s scores on the Nursing Entrance Tests that they administer on campus. The NET (Nurse Entrance Test) is a computer based test consisting of six parts: math skills, reading comprehension, test taking skills, stress level, social interaction, and learning style. All six parts must be completed in order to receive scores and be considered for admission. However, only the math and reading scores will be used to calculate application eligibility. A reading score of 60% or higher and a math score of 50% or higher must be achieved for admission to one of the Maricopa Community Colleges’ Nursing Programs.

Math skills problems consist of whole numbers, decimals, fractions, percentages, number system conversions and algebra equations. Calculators are NOT allowed. Scratch paper will be provided.

Reading comprehension involves reading selections and answering questions. Not only do most schools prefer their student’s take the Nursing Entrance Test on their campus, but there are many versions of the N.E.T. circulating throughout the various nursing schools throughout the United States, such as the H.E.S.I., the ATT, and the T.E.A.S.. With all these variations of the N.E.T. it is no wonder that student’s have trouble with their search for reliable study materials. It is for this reason that we developed a comprehensive online tutorial platform that includes Anatomy and Physiology, Chemistry, Biology, English Grammar and heavy on the Math and Reading Comprehension. In doing this we have helped students prepare for any and all Nursing Entrance Tests successfully. Participants at the seminar were very pleased with all of the help and free software that they received. We are going to keep on developing more and more practice tests. We want everyone to pass the Nursing Entrance Test the first time.


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Nursing Entrance Test, Test Anxiety and Stress

Written by kimmel52 on October 23, 2009 – 6:27 pm

What is the Nursing Entrance Test? The test evaluates areas that are essential for academic success including basic math skills up to beginning algebra and reading comprehension. The Nursing Entrance Test must be passed with a score that is dictated by the community college or university. Some nursing schools require higher passing scores than others. Also, some of the nursing schools are now beginning to allow only three attempts for passing. The test ranges in price from $25.00 to $40.00 depending on which nursing school you apply.

The Nursing Entrance Test provides a measurement of your scholastic abilities and compares them to mastery levels needed for success in college. The test contains 7 sections administered in this order: (1) Comprehensive Math, (2) Reading Rate, (3) Reading Comprehension, (4) Social Decisions, (5) Stressful Situation, (6) Learning Styles and (7) Test taking Skills. The time allotted for the test is 2 hours and 31 minutes. The only two sections that you are actually graded on for passing are the math and reading comprehension sections of the test.

Consequently, the stress is extremely high for first time test takers and even more so for those who are on their last and third try. This is the highest stress, because these people who are taking the Nursing Entrance Test for the third and last time have to make a decision about going to another nursing school if they fail, and hoping that the other nursing school will allow all of their credits to transfer. No matter how you look at it, the entire nursing program along with the necessary prerequisites takes about three years. Even though students may have finished a year of prerequisites, they cannot get onto the nursing school waiting list until they pass the Nursing Entrance Test, and after they pass there is a one to a two year wait. So, consequently, the stress levels are through the roof.

So what can you do to ease off some of this stress? Well, for starters it helps to be prepared the day of the test. The best advice to achieve successful results would be to get a tutorial that is as close to the Nursing Entrance Test content as possible. Fortunately, this software is available. The NET Study Guide is the most informative tutorial and offers a money back guarantee if you don’t pass. The software is set up identical to the Nursing Entrance Test, so the student can practice in the comfort of their own home. The slides are timed for one minute per slide, which is about the amount of time that you want to spend per question. Although the learner has the option of review and evaluation of their results anytime they wish as well as all of the answers with complete explanations in audio and visual format. There is also a hotline number that you can call if you get stuck on a problem. So, you are not alone.

Much of the stress that comes with learning and practicing new material is similar to feeling like being on an island. The NET Study Guide author, Dr. Nancy Lydia Kimmel is committed to giving as much help as possible to those who use the software in order for them to achieve successful results on the Nursing Entrance Test. How about handling stress the day of the test? There are many methods that can be used to enhance test performance and relieve stress. First, there is visual imagery. Visual imagery has to do with imagining your favorite place, putting yourself right in the scene. It is like a waking dream state. Try this simple visual imagery example and see how you feel afterward?

“Ask yourself this question. What is the most relaxing place that you can imagine? Is it in a cozy cabin in the middle of winter with the soft light of logs burning in the fireplace? Maybe you see yourself on a beach, lounging on a hammock, sipping a cold drink, listening to the sound of the soft waves lapping up to the shore, with a warm breeze blowing, and the sun gently caressing your skin. Take a deep breath of the fresh air, hold it in for a second or two, and then gently let it out through pursed lips. As you let the air out, you hear the seagull’s distant call. Let’s inhale one more time, in through the nose. As you breathe in, feel positive about yourself. You are in charge, you have studied, you know this material and you will do well. Now, let your breath out slowly through pursed lips, taking in the beauty around you. Relax your body, start with your toes, wiggle your toes and let out the tension, next let you legs go limp, relax, now your arms and your shoulders, now your head. Roll your head from side to side, let out all the stress, let go of all the negative energy, you don’t need it. Let it drain out through you body. Think positive, you know this material. You will do well.”

The above scenario is a type of visual imagery that is not only used for test anxiety but also in nursing, for patients to help them handle chronic pain. Test anxiety can cause approximately a 20-30% error rate. This can be the difference between a passing and failing score. You don’t want test anxiety to beat you. At the web site, www.thenetstudyguide.com you will be able to purchase test anxiety Audio CD’s put to gentle music with a calm quiet voice guiding the listener. You want to listen to this prior to going in to the test.

Stress has many adverse symptoms; it can raise the heart rate and respiration. Stress can cause other physical ailments such as gastric upset, heart palpitations and ulcers. These symptoms can be a very serious handicap to those wanting to learn. Continued stress can leave someone in a state of hopelessness. This is not what you want happening to you. You need to tackle your stress early, and know how to handle what ever comes your way. Always have a plan, and do not get discouraged. Remember, that the journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step. It is very necessary to have a way to relax and focus to avoid crippling test anxiety. There is that stress which some refer to as beneficial stress. That is the stress that you feel good about, like the race that you had to run and practiced for all week. You want to turn negative stress into a positive stress with less emphasis on stress and more on your intellectual power.

If you have the desire to go into nursing, then you must first get ready to take the N.E.T., the HESI or the TEAS entrance test. You can begin preparing for your career by practicing your skills using the online tutorials and tests at The Nurses Learning Center. There are over 1000 questions and answers. You will get unlimited internet access, 24/7. It is yours to keep. New questions are added daily.   It is like taking the actual nursing entrance test in the privacy of your own home.  You have the option of taking a timed or an untimed test.  This option will help you develop your skills at test taking as well as devloping your critical thinking skills.


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Why is the NET Reading Comprehension so Difficult?

Written by kimmel52 on October 23, 2009 – 5:18 pm

One of the questions that I get the most from students and customers who call in is; “Why do they make the reading comprehension section of the NET so difficult?” or, “I have purchased all of the Kaplan, Princeton, and Barrons guides, and none of them have helped me to pass the NET. Why?” These similar questions go on and on. Here is the explanation that I give to all who call me; first or all, the NET is not written like a test geared for graduate school admission, nor is the NET reading comprehension written like the SAT, ACT or any college entrance admission test. Take it from someone who has taken all these tests and more as well as the nursing entrance test. The nursing entrance test is written to help test the critical thinking skills of the reader. So what does that exactly mean? Read more »


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Reading Comprehension on the N.E.T., HESI and The TEAS, How To Study to Pass

Written by kimmel52 on October 23, 2009 – 10:25 am

Critical Thinking on the NET Reading Comprehension

First one must be comfortable with reading. It is unfortunate in today’s culture that so much information is portrayed in visual media. How many people go to the library any more to pick up a classic like Huck Finn or Moby Dick? Colleges are also at fault for being lax at not pushing student’s to their maximum potential. Hence, when pre nursing students get to the point that their pre requisites are completed they sit for the NET and fail. The skill that many are missing is that of critical thinking. Critical thinking cannot be learned over night. Which is why so many students fail the second and third time they take the NET. Obviously there must be a way to pass the reading comprehension section without taking more courses in English. There is to be sure. As in mathematics where there is a logical sequence to solving problems, there is likewise a logical path associated with the reading comprehension. There are several key operating words that play a part in the questions and passages. Knowing what those key words are and how to interpret them are crucial to achieving a passing score. The reading comprehension of the NET is much more than memorizing what happened in a passage. It is more correct to state why this has happened in a passage based only on what information is provided. So many times students search their memory trying to pull from prior knowledge to answer the questions. This is the biggest mistake that they can make. The questions are designed so that all content must come from the passages, even if it seems that the questions are far reaching. All questions are based purely on the passage. Even if a student can prove the author is in error, it makes no difference since all the answers are based on the passage.

To begin practicing now just go to the nurses learning center and you can get unlimited access for as long as you want.  Just log in and start practicing.


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Phlebotomy Practice

Written by kimmel52 on September 20, 2009 – 11:07 pm

Phlebotomy Practice Test Final 200 points

Phlebotomy Career Training, 28050 Ford Road, Garden City MI 48135
Phlebotomy Career Training 28050 Ford Road, Garden City MI 48135

Name: ____________________-

All Materials Copyright 2009, Phlebotomy Career Training, by Nancy Kimmel RN, PhD, CHMM, CNAT,

For the questions below list the order of draw according to tube color, number of tubes used and any preparation needed such as inversion times and whether or not it is a fresh frozen specimen.  You may refer to your lab handouts as reference.

Your labs are as follows;

  1. TSH, Electrolytes, Lipid Panel, Blood Cultures
  2. Your labs are as follows; Dilanitin level, Gentamyacin Peak, Sickle Cel

3.  Your labs are as follows; Hgb (hemoglobin), Hct (hematocrit), AST, ALT,  PTT

Fasting 6 hour Glucose, Hgb A1C, Depakene level

Serum Albumin, Alk Phos, Na, K, Cl, CO2

(See The Study Guide for Phlebotomy Certification)


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Dietary Needs of the Diabetic Patient

Written by kimmel52 on November 11, 2008 – 10:52 pm

The diabetic patient can help control their blood glucose levels in conjunction with a healthy diet. Not only can they help to control their blood glucose levels with a healthy diet, but their lipids and blood pressure as well. Nutrition recommendations are developed from the following table:

Carbohydrates: /diabetics should choose from a selection of grains, fruits and vegetables. Fruits such as apricots, peaches, mangos, are high in vitamin C and have are a good source of roughage. Grains such as oats, wheat and barley are excellent choices. Having hot cereal like wheat and barley can be a real treat, especially when using Splenda® as a sugar substitute, and a small amount of butter. These carbohydrates are broken down gradually and stored in the liver. They are turned into glucose upon the bodies need at the moment.

Sweetners:/ It is best to avoid processed sweets, such as cakes, doughnuts, cookies and soda pop. Processed sweets and carbonated beverages contain large amounts of preservatives and sodium. The saying, “where sodium goes, water follows.”, is a good saying to keep in mind. What this means, is that the more sodium that is ingested, the more water the body will retain. Water retention leads to high blood pressure and increased pressure in the glomerular tubules within the kidney. As pressure builds up in this area, stage two of kidney disease can occur. It is difficult for those diabetics who are used to drinking sugar free soda. Try to break this habit. The main idea about dietary changes is that it is not a quick fix, but a life style change. The diabetic has to change their way of thinking about the foods that they normally eat. Use sweeteners judiciously. The best alternative is to become used to the taste of natural sugars, and to avoid sodium. Try not using salt for a few days. It is not hard to get accustomed to this. The diabetic will be able to taste the natural salt in their food without adding any extra salt.

Fats:/ Try to keep the fat content in the diet as low as possible. Trim the fat from meat prior to cooking. Braising the meat prior to adding water can eliminate extra fat left on the meat and add flavor to the broth. Read the labels of foods when purchasing groceries. Fat content will increase the diabetic’s blood glucose level, because ingested fat will stay in the system longer. Similar to fast digesting sugars, fat offers up lots of carbohydrates. These carbohydrates can be turned into sugars readily. Before the stored carbohydrates are broken down the body will use the undigested fat molecules. If the person is not active to burn calories, the fat will sit around and what ever portion is not used, the body will store. To explain this theory better, think about oil candles. The oil will burn for hours before being used up. Now imagine cotton candy. Cotton candy will flame and burn to a crisp with practically nothing left within seconds. This is how our body uses fats and sugars. When the body needs glucose, glycogen stored in the liver is enzymatically transformed into glucagon, which is transformed into glucose to feed our body from burning ATP (the body’s energy molecule). When all of the glucose is used up, the body begins to use up carbohydrates, and after the carbohydrates the body then burns fat. Once the fat is burned, the body begins to utilize protein. This protein can be found in the urine, and is a signal of malnutrition. Knowing what fats are good and which are bad can be very confusing. The best rule of thumb is to avoid processed foods and use meats that are not fatty or marbled with fat throughout. Bake, broil or boil foods. Braise meats in a pan after trimming the fat. Use seasonings without added salt. Using pure seasonings is a fantastic tasting experience. Fresh rosemary, thyme, oregano, and a host of other seasonings can add wonderful flavor to a meal. Use olive oil in place of the usual cooking oils. Some olive oils state that they are half corn oil and half olive. This is better than using 100% corn oil or canola oil. Try using fresh ground pepper and garlic cloves in place of salt additives. Keep in mind that you are what you eat, as the saying goes. Being healthy should be the most important goal of not only diabetics but for everyone.

If you have the desire to go into nursing, then you must first get ready to take the N.E.T., the HESI or the TEAS entrance test. You can begin preparing for your career by practicing your skills using the online tutorials and tests at The Nurses Learning Center. There are over 1000 questions and answers. You will get unlimited internet access, 24/7. It is yours to keep. New questions are added daily. It’s like sitting for the N.E.T., The HESI or the TEAS in your home.


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Hyperkalemia

Written by kimmel52 on November 11, 2008 – 10:41 am

Electrolyte imbalances within the body can occur in response to many factors. When a person is dehydrated either from sickness or starvation, their electrolytes can become depleted. Certain medications can cause electrolyte imbalances as well as chronic diseases such as diabetes and renal failure. Electrolytes have a large role in balancing all metabolic reactions related to the delicate pH balance of the body, which is 7.35-7.45. Within this limited pH range all metabolic reactions can go to completion. For instance ATP can be released and produced, muscle contractions occur in simple or complex body movements, our thinking processes and those muscle contractions not in conscious control such as our beating heart and peristalsis of the bowel. When a particular electrolyte is either in to great or too small a concentration the pH of the body responds in kind to correct the imbalance by pulling from other sources in the body. When this happens the person begins to have symptoms that something is wrong. Sometimes the symptoms are barely noticeable while other times the person must be immediately hospitalized in intensive care. Hyperkalemia deals with an electrolyte imbalance in which there is too much potassium or (K+) in the body. When the serum potassium levels rise above 5.3 mEq/L or the blood pH drops below 7.35 the person is considered to be in a state of hyperkalemia. Hyperkalemia is diagnosed in up to 8% of hospitalized patients. Death can be as high as 67% if severe hyperkalemia is not treated quickly. Drugs are an underlying cause in 75% of inpatient cases. Some of the causes of hypekalemia can be seen in the table below;

Decreased Excretion

Excessive Ingestion

Interstitial Fluid Shift

Renal Failure (creatinine <10mL/min

Rapid IV infusion

Metabolic acidosis

Use of potassium sparing diuretics

Potassium supplements

Diabetic Ketoacidosis, K+ moves out into blood stream

Decreased aldosterone secretion

Metabolic acidosis

Anti hypertensives such as Beta Blocker and ACE Inhibitors

Signs and symptoms of hyperkalemia include muscle cramps, weakness in the lower extremities, nausea, diarrhea, low blood pressure, bradycardia, and an abnormal electrocardiogram. It is important to carefully monitor the elderly and small children for hyperkalemia. Normal occurrences like diarrhea and vomiting can be life threatening to infants and the elderly. This is due to the lack of fluids within them prior to the occurrence. Therefore careful observation for the above signs and symptoms can save a life. The first step in treatment is to determine whether life threatening cardiac toxicity is present and treat if required. Treatment is based on eliminating or decreasing potassium intake, shifting potassium form the ECF to the ICF, and improving renal and gastrointestinal potassium excretion. With cardiac arrhythmias or changes in the ECG, IV calcium gluconate is given first, then insulin or sodium bicarbonate is administered. If output does not exceed greater than 30 mL per hour then dialysis is usually started.

ECG abnormalities from hyperkalemia related to the P wave include either a low amplitude or wide and flattened to non discernible in severe states. The PR interval may be normal or prolonged, or not measurable if there is no P wave. The QRS complex is widened, and the T wave is tall and peaked. The QT interval is shortened and the ST segment may be elevated.

References

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, ECG Interpretation an Incredibly Easy Pocket Guide., copyright 2006

Macklin, Murphy-Ende., Saunders Nursing Survival Guide Fluids and Electrolytes, Copyright 2006, Saunders Elsevier, St. Louis Missouri

If you have the desire to go into nursing, then you must first get ready to take the N.E.T., the HESI or the TEAS entrance test. You can begin preparing for your career by practicing your skills using the online tutorials and tests at The Nurses Learning Center. There are over 1000 questions and answers. You will get unlimited internet access, 24/7. It is yours to keep. New questions are added daily. It’s like sitting for the N.E.T., The HESI or the TEAS in your home.


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