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Treatment of Pressure Ulcers

Written by kimmel52 on November 25, 2012 – 11:08 pm

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Change in practice assignment
The purpose of this article is to address the problem of the development of pressure ulcers occurring in susceptible individuals during short terms stays in the hospital. Identifying those factors that put patients at risk and critically evaluate current nursing practices used on the floor, such as documentation, identification and current methods of prevention.
The Development of Pressure Ulcers during Short Term Stays
According to the National Guideline Clearing House, people of all ages are at risk of developing pressure sores based on the vulnerability of their current health status (“Target population,” 2011, para. 4). In the current work setting, almost all patients with limited mobility who cannot get out of bed by themselves and need to wear briefs or use the bedpan begin to develop a stage I pressure ulcer prior to discharge within 1 -2 days after hospitalization or short term emergency room stay. The hallmark of quality nursing care is excellent skin care (Wurster, 2007, p. 267). It is up to the nurse to lead the role in pressure ulcer prevention. The importance of this problem extends beyond the hospitalization stage. Those individuals who are discharged with stage 1 pressure ulcers do not always have properly trained family members to care for them thereby preventing the stage 1 from getting worse. For many of the elderly patients, pressure sores are a common health problem particularly among the physically limited or bedridden and without proper treatment can remain for the duration of the persons life (Jaul, 2010).
The incidence of pressure sores has increased by 63% between the years of 1993 to 2003 in hospitalized patients(Wurster, 2007). The nurse is responsible for targeting the care that these patients need to receive to prevent pressure ulcer development. Coordinating staff to work as a team is currently lagging in the work place. The charge nurse does not follow up on the staff nurse notes, nor does the staff nurse follow up on the nurse aide tasks of turning the patients and providing nutritional supplements provided by their dietary orders. The assessment and management of pressure ulcers require a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach (Jaul, 2010, p. 313). Read more »


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