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The N.E.T. A&P Review

Written by kimmel52 on March 11, 2009 – 12:51 am

The student who is studying for the NURSING ENTRANCE TEST, THE HESI OR THE TEAS-ATT, will have to take an exam on anatomy and physiology. Preparing for this section is not easy. It is very difficult to remember every piece of information from two semesters of anatomy and physiology. At the Nurses Learning Center, students are able to study A&P in a logical fashion that pulls all of their knowledge together and applies the concepts that they have learned in real life situations.
An example of how to study anatomy and physiology is by looking at the bowel and intestinal tract through types of infections and aliments that can occur. This is one of the best ways to study for THE NURSING ENTRANCE TEST. Below is an explanation of how ulcerative colitis begins and its signs and symptoms. Keep in mind while reading the passage what you have learned from anatomy and physiology, and try to see how the endocrine system and the digestive system come into play.

Ulcerative colitis usually appears with chronic symptoms from mild to severe. These symptoms include but are not limited to bloody diarrhea, abdominal pain and cramping, fever, malaise, anorexia, tachycardia and dehydration.

With the milder form of the disease, diarrhea and abdominal pain may be mild, unless there is a perforation in which the pain becomes much worse. In the moderate disease an individual may have up to five stools per day. In the severe form of the disease, an individual can have up to ten or more stools per day. Ulcerative colitis is a disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the lining of the rectum and colon. Ulcers form where inflammation has killed the cells that usually line the colon, then bleed and produce pus. Inflammation in the colon also causes the colon to empty frequently, causing diarrhea

When the inflammation occurs in the rectum and lower part of the colon it is called ulcerative proctitis. If the entire colon is affected it is called pancolitis. If only the left side of the colon is affected it is called limited or distal colitis. Ulcerative colitis can occur in people of any age, but it usually starts between the ages of 15 and 30, and less frequently between 50 and 70 years of age. It affects men and women equally and appears to run in families, with reports of up to 20 percent of people with ulcerative colitis having a family member or relative with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. A higher incidence of ulcerative colitis is seen in Whites and people of Jewish descent.

With any disease there are complications that can arise. Read more »


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